Hartford learns of JFK murder

For the last few years, I’ve made a ritual of listening to this recording of the call-in show that WTIC-AM/FM in Hartford was airing as news of JFK’s murder broke on the afternoon of November 22, 1963. The first news bulletin comes at about the 26-minute mark. But what’s also haunting is the conversation leading up to it: how to make a German chocolate cake, when to trim a maple tree, what the Sigourney-Burk market had for specials that week. So mundane. Then the world changes.

Also on Youtube: Dennis House, then host of the WFSB-TV Sunday morning show “Face the State,” marked the 50th anniversary of the assassination with a look back at how local news organizations covered it:

Matthew Ritter will be the latest speaker from Hartford

With Hartford’s Matthew D. Ritter set to become the next speaker of the Connecticut House of Representatives, this is a good time to list the seven previous speakers from Hartford. They include Ritter’s father, Thomas D. Ritter. All lived in the city at the time of their election.

NamePolitical PartyTerm of Service
William W. EatonDemocratic1853
Henry C. DemingDemocratic1861
Eliphalet A. BulkeleyUnion1857
William W. EatonDemocratic1873
Joseph L. BarbourRepublican1897
James J. KennellyDemocratic1975-78
Thomas D. RitterDemocratic1993-98
Matthew D. RitterDemocratic2020-
Source: Connecticut Register and Manual, 2019 edition, published by the Secretary of the State. Online at https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/SOTS/RegisterManual/RM_Archive/CT2019.pdf

Eugene Gaddis, Wadsworth Atheneum archivist and author

Eugene Gaddis, a longtime archivist at the Wadsworth Atheneum and biographer of legendary Atheneum director A. Everett “Chick” Austin Jr., has died at age 72.

Gaddis, who was retired, died at his home in West Hartford on August 18, according to his obituary on Legacy.com.

In 2000, Knopf published Gaddis’ “Magician of the Modern: Chick Austin and the Transformation of the Arts in America.” The book describes how Austin, arriving at the Atheneum in 1927 as its first professional director, pushed and cajoled the conservative museum into showing modern art. Soon, the Atheneum found itself not just participating in the modern art movement–it was in the vanguard of it. Because of Austin’s many connections, the book also serves as a chronicle of Hartford’s arts and social scene in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s.

In 1986, when the Austin family gave its Scarborough Street home to the Atheneum, Gaddis became its curator, eventually working to restore it and securing its recognition as a National Historic Landmark.

Gaddis’ tenure with the Atheneum began in 1981, when a week-long survey of museum records led to him creating the archives. He also became a well-known speaker on the Atheneum, and taught classes at at Hartford College for Woman and at the Hartford branch of the University of Connecticut.

A memorial service will be held when it is safe to do so.

Checking on the neighbors

Noah Webster House video grab

Kudos to the Noah Webster House & West Hartford Historical Society for its “Armchair Tour of West Hartford History,” a series of video tours created in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. While the tours focus on West Hartford history, many touch on Hartford’s as well. For instance, there’s a visit to the American School for the Deaf–which began on Main Street in Hartford and moved to its present campus on South Main Street in West Hartford in 1921. Of course, there’s also one on Elizabeth Park, which straddles the Hartford-West Hartford line. Jennifer Matos, executive director of the museum, hosts each episode. You’ll find them on the museum’s Facebook page and website.

From the Charter Oak to the last of the red-hot mamas

If you haven’t subscribed to Grating the Nutmeg, a podcast dedicated to Connecticut history, you’ve been missing some great Hartford-related episodes.

Logo for Grating the Nutmeg, a podcast dedicated to Connecticut history.

In the August 19th episode, State Historian Walt Woodward delved into the legend of the Charter Oak. He offered “a new, true, and sometimes amusing look into the history behind this foundational legend.” Mary M. Donohue, assistant publisher of Connecticut Explored, followed on August 30 with the story of Sophie Tucker, the internationally famous entertainer who grew up in Hartford’s East End.

Speaking of entertainment, be sure to listen to the Charter Oak episode all the way to the end. That’s where Woodward channels Hartford poet Lydia Sigourney by giving a dramatic recitation of the elegy she wrote when the tree fell in 1856. It’s, um, unforgettable.

These were the 100th and 101st episodes of the podcast, a project of Woodward’s office and Connecticut Explored, a quarterly magazine concerning state history. Fortunately, you can catch up on all of the episodes in this archive. (And here are some of the Hartford-related ones.)

New trivia question

From 1948 to 1962, the CBS radio network presented a serial drama about a Hartford-based insurance investigator who traveled the country to get to the bottom of suspicious claims, which almost always turned out to center on murder or some other crime. The investigator/title character narrated cases by reading from the expense reports he sent back to Hartford. Thus, at the beginning of each episode, an announcer introduced “the transcribed adventures of the man with the action-packed expense account, America’s fabulous freelance insurance investigator …”

What was the name of this show? Click here for the answer.

New app makes it easy to tour historic Connecticut

Congratulations to Connecticut Humanities for its launch of ConnTours, an app that lets you use your mobile device to tour Connecticut historic sites based on theme or municipality.

The app is a work in progress, but the themes so far include the Architectural Wonders Trail, the Leisure Trail, the Literary Trail, the Revolutionary Trail, the War of 1812 Trail, and the Women’s Heritage Trail. Hartford has stops on each of these trails (except, strangely, the Revolutionary Trail.) The municipality section so far has only three towns or cities, but thankfully Hartford is one of them. Overall, the project shows a lot of promise.

The ConnTours app can be downloaded for free from Google Play and Apple’s App Store. You can also use the website version.

Perry to be remembered Wednesday

A memorial service for former Mayor Carrie Saxon Perry will be held at 5:30 p.m. tomorrow, February 5, at the Arts Collective, at 1200 Albany Avenue.

Perry was the first African-American woman to be elected mayor of a major New England city, serving from 1987 to 1993. She died in the emergency room of Waterbury Hospital on Nov. 22, 2018, but the death remained unknown–even to friends and neighbors who knew her well–for nearly a year. Why that happened remains a mystery, according to the Hartford Courant.